let's go hand in hand

to infinity and beyond

Shopping Clinics in Myanmar

Every time we meet friends or acquaintance these days, the opening greeting words we usually get is – “when are you guys going to have baby? Soon?”  I often respond with a joke that I have not found the clinic (or doctors) and school good enough for my kids yet in Yangon.

I say it like a joke but in fact, that is what I am concerned most. We are not planning to conceive – not yet right now. However, for the last two years, I have been visiting clinics and listening to people’s recommendation and reviewing the CVs of some OGs.  At the same time, I have been taking all preparatory steps and necessary measures – taking vaccines, regular medical checkups, and now, committing myself taking regular exercises.

If you are just finding the most expensive and most popular clinics and celebrity alike OGs and if you define them as “the best”, you can easily find them. That is not what we are looking for and that is not what we think “the best” for our kids.  What we are looking for is –basic and simple quality a clinic and a medical doctor should possess – “professionalism, care, and ability a patient’s concern and needs are well taken into consideration, and that patients were and clearly consulted in each complicated medical process”, but we just could not find them yet.

However, my proactive two-year efforts in shopping clinics are not all in vain. I may not find a suitable one yet, but at least I find which are not suitable.

Baby can wait until then! Once things get right, I should be all ready to bear a healthy and happy little one as I can.

Five-month Anniversary

We are celebrating and enjoying our together moment at our own little world in Dubai. Mg made our delicious dinner. We took a couple of pictures together. :)

Our moment. Our time together. It is like the together moment in the hot tub as this one blogger writes – while the real life and more serious responsibilities are waiting outside. But, as the author mentions, the cocoon. The comfort. The warmth of togetherness. All are just so special, especially for us who had experienced years of tormenting lonely life being away from each other – it is just so hard even for this very stubborn and tough duo; the thinking of absence from one another is such a heart-breaking nightmare – we still could not bring up the issue of another separation and anything led to it without our eyes tearing up.  Just hard.

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Organic Love

The Real Meaning and Value of Home-cooked Meals

The culture of home-cooked meals and dinning at home has been eroding in many parts of the world. Sadly, to many families, the term “happy meals” is all about dinning at McDonalds.

As a child grown up in a farming family at the upper part of Burma, meals I know were all home-cooked.  All foods we cooked were home-grown; all came from our farm or shared by neighbors’ farms. Apart from some snacks, my family had dined outside not more than once or twice as year, for the whole of my childhood life. The main reasons we did not dine outside were foods at restaurants were relatively expensive, and they are not considered as hygienic.  I remember, even when we took days-long trips, we prepared foods which could last during the trips.

Our daily breakfast, which came in very early morning around 6:00 am before my father was off to the farm, was very simple – mostly freshly cooked white rice mixed with boiled beans; we seasoned it with peanut oil and salt, and served with some sour pickles. If we could get it with a vada or dried fishes, that meant luxury for us. On weekends, we brought our breakfast to the farm and ate together with our dad, other neighbor farmers, and farm workers. It was like a community breakfast. I remember we prepared it in a large bowl; everyone sat down on the ground in a circle around the bowl and shared it together. We, kids, also had a chance to listen to the conversations of local farmers at the breakfast circle- topics varied from about crops, farming techniques to community issues and political issues as well. My father encouraged us to give our opinions as well. When we got a little bit older, my father and other local farmers even asked us our suggestions how to improve things  as they regarded us more educated than they were. And, we also helped out our parents’ farming chores in the remaining morning times, and rested and did our homework inside the farm house when the heat outside got stronger. Lunches back in home were usually more bigger meals with well-cooked meat and vegetable curries, and soup served with rice, and dinners were with freshly cooked hot curries with all vegetables freshly hand-picked from the farm. Yes, we ate everyday and every meal with the family. It is more than a meal. It provides a crucial family bonding time so that the older generation could hand down traditions to the younger generation, and helped them out to have the tools necessary for life.  I believe these all amazing experiences made us balanced, healthy, and well-grounded.

A U.S. practicing physician, Dr Mark Hyman, wrote an article in the Huffington Post about how dining at home can contribute to your good health and the well-being of your children.

“Research shows that children who have regular meals with their parents do better in every way, from better grades, to healthier relationships, to staying out of trouble. They are 42 percent less likely to drink, 50 percent less likely to smoke and 66 percent less like to smoke marijuana. Regular family dinners protect girls from bulimia, anorexia, and diet pills. Family dinners also reduce the incidence of childhood obesity. In a study on household routines and obesity in U.S. preschool-aged children, it was shown that kids as young as four have a lower risk of obesity if they eat regular family dinners, have enough sleep, and don’t watch TV on weekdays.”

Thanks to my family traditions well rooted in me, breakfast is still my favorite meal; I am a big believer in that keeping the tradition of eating real, whole foods at home together is the best practice to our good health, to strengthen our family ties, and to resist the influence of industrial food culture wiping out local farms and small local businesses, in addition to giving people poisonous foods by using harmful non-foods substances and manipulating them with misleading various ads.

Now, I’m a recently married wife resettled in a different country. Luckily, my husband also loves cooking and values a home-cooked meal more than dinning at popular dine-outs in town. With the recipes we brought from home, our delicious traditional Burmese dishes give us a sense of home and comfort at the place away from home, and sometimes, we tried out different  indigenous cuisines at our little kitchen. Our meals are not fancy, but simple and comfort dishes easy to make. As a married couple, not only eating wholesome home-cooked matters to our good heath, but also the together part, we can get while making foods, matters to strengthen our marriage tie. Those little things – like little bonding time in the kitchen, little kisses and hugs you receive and give your spouse while helping out each other in making foods, exchanging thoughts on recipes (sometimes, messing up with the recipes), and well, pleasure of sharing delicious dishes with the one we love, energize us carrying ourselves from being happily married, to building happy family life, and to bearing happy children in the future.

A Love Story

Eight Year Anniversary

It was the majestic eight. We were a happily married couple of four months living in Dubai. As my anniversary gift to mg, I put things together in this blog. On our anniversary evening, without making a call to me, Mg came back home from work earlier than he usually did to make me surprised with a cute cake. We ate dinner and cake. Mg took me out for an evening walk and had ice-cream at my favorite shop in town. Once we got back home, he read me out all what I had written about us on this blog while feeding each other all the left over cake before the semi final Euro 2012 soccer match – Spain Vs Portugal was on. After the a bit boring 90 +  extra 30 minutes game and penalty shoot out, our pick, Spain, won. Our celebrations went on. :)

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To the love of my life

This is my very first letter to Mg responding his love for me. Unlike that many people would have written in their first love letters, mine is pretty depressing. Since at the very beginning, I knew we did have a long way to go to the point we could settle down and start a together life. Instead of pouring love and all sweet words in it, my letter is full of my concerns for our relationship (which we had not even started it yet). Nevertheless, it does show my seriousness in the relationship we were about to start. I was just reluctant to get myself in a relationship b’coz I knew myself well, if I get in, I will make it work as perfect as possible with all my heart and energy, but, at that time, I was still very young with full of dreams and energy for my own life ahead. I was so afraid of I would have to come out with a broken heart –  disturbing other things I had to do in my life if a relationship did not work out. Neither did I want that the other one felt hurt – if that did not work out just because I put less seriousness. Read the rest of this entry »

One Love, One Heart, One Destiny.

 

Growing Up Together

Early 1990s                           : WT (Mg, Husband) and WP (Wai, Wife) grow up together in a same village called Monywe and go to the same village high school. WT is one year junior than WP.

Life after High School

Late 1990s & E. 2000s      : WP abandons the idea of going to a college in Myanmar (which all were closed down lengthy at that time for the political reasons.); leaves her native village, first moves to Mandalay, and then to Yangon, studying and preparing for a career in journalism.  WP joins the Myanmar Times as a reporter in 2001.

: Meanwhile, WT prepared for a university life – first joined to a military engineering school, the Defense Services Institute of Technology (DSIT), and then, to the University of Computer Studies in Monywa before leaving for Malaysia to work. Read the rest of this entry »

Art of LOVE

This post is the collection of the pictures to show the milestones of our together journey from the day we got to know to the day we married.

Simply, we are so blessed. 

We find ‘true love’ in each other. 

‘Love’ makes our lives a lot different.

A lot easier. A lot prettier. 

We are in love EVER. 

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A Song Keyed to My Heart

The song opened my heart. Eventually, it has led us to this moment – together life. We both grew up at the same village and went to the same high school. However, we did not hit it off until we met again in Yangon in 2004. I was working as a newspaper reporter in Yangon, and Mg just came back from Malaysia after being accepted by a college in the United States. He was in town while working on his application process for his U.S. student visa.  Whenever he wanted to talk about his visa documents, he often stopped by at my office and sometime, he waited outside until my news reports were done for a day. Then, we often hang out and talked about his papers over the dinner at some street shops. Read the rest of this entry »

Promise to Eternity

Eight years ago, today, someone whom I now dearly call him ‘mg’ asked me to be his life partner, and to give him seven years to be able to ask my hand from my parents. Considering the fact we were still too young, and our uncertain future ahead we had at that time, it was hard to make such a big commitment. But, a couple of weeks later, I reluctantly answered ‘yes’ and promised him I will wait for him. Passionate courtship was followed up. Through the years, best friendship has developed. Trust and understanding for each other gradually brought one true love in for us. On our eighth anniversary day, we are here in Dubai happily together as a married couple started four months ago. And, nothing else just does not matter.

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